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THE U.S. FENTANYL CRISIS   

"One Pill Can kilL"

 

"When the history of the fentanyl crisis is written, 2023 may be remembered as the year Americans woke up to an unprecedented threat scouring communities - and a deepening cultural divide over what to do about it." 

                                            - NPR - In 2023 fentanyl overdoses ravaged the U.S. and fueled a new culture war fight - DECEMBER 28, 2023  8:51 AM ET

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Sudden Fentanyl Death – Not an “Overdose” – a mass Poisoning of epic proportions!

There is a crisis in this country that has killed more Americans than the last 4 major wars; Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War, and the War on Terror (Iraq-Afghanistan).  Yes, that’s right, there is a silent war against our U.S. Citizens that is killing almost 150 people per day, and it’s estimated to have already taken over 300,000 lives.  It’s the silent war, waged by our enemies, to wipe out entire generations of our youth, and it’s an unmitigated crisis primarily killing our loved ones between the ages of 18 – 45.  This war is very different from the others.  It’s quiet, it’s going unnoticed, but it’s happening right in front of our eyes, and It’s called the illicit fentanyl crisis killing our citizens by the thousands.

 

Hundreds of Thousands of Americans have died in the last three years due to Fentanyl related poisonings and overdoses, and it’s only getting worse.  Thousands of pounds of this deadly drug, especially in pill form, is pouring across our border, and that’s just what we’re catching.  Data taken from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency’s website states; In 2023, the DEA seized more than 79.5 million fentanyl-laced fake pills and nearly 12,000 pounds of fentanyl powder.  Yes, you read that correctly.  In 2023 the seizures alone are equivalent to more than 376.7 million lethal doses of fentanyl, enough to kill every man, woman, and child in the United States of America.  These are very scary facts, especially if you are a parent or a spouse or a relative.  The crisis is only gaining momentum.  It’s taking more and more lives every day, and as of now, it seems there is no end in sight.

So, as a parent who has lost a son to a sudden an unexpected Fentanyl poisoning death, I am pleading for your help to spread the word, to talk about this deadly drug, and to create such a noise that this crisis will not go unnoticed any longer.  That we will fight for those lost voices who cannot fight for themselves anymore, that we will fight for the families who have lost their loved ones, that we will fight for the lives of those that still have a voice, that we will fight for the living, and that all of us, together, will force the powers that be to hear us, to listen to us, so that they will stop this crisis, and put an end to these sudden, unexpected and unnecessary deaths, so that not one more family will suffer through the pain and the grief that those Angels parents who have lost their loved ones have had to endure.

 

- Bryan K. Lugo, Angel Parent  
 

Who is affected by this

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1. National Drug-Involved Overdose Deaths—Number Among All Ages, by Gender, 1999-2021. More than 106,000 persons in the U.S. died from drug-involved overdose in 2021, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. drug overdose deaths involving select illicit or prescription drugs from 1999 to 2021. The bars are overlaid by lines showing the number of deaths by gender from 1999 to 2021 (Source: CDC WONDER).

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2. National Drug-Involved Overdose Deaths by Specific Category—Number Among All Ages, 1999-2021. Overall, drug overdose deaths rose from 2019 to 2021 with more than 106,000 drug overdose deaths reported in 2021. Deaths involving synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl) continued to rise with 70,601 overdose deaths reported in 2021. Those involving stimulants, including cocaine or psychostimulants with abuse potential (primarily methamphetamine), also continued to increase with 32,537 overdose deaths in 2021 (Source: CDC WONDER).

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3. National Overdose Deaths Involving Any Opioid—Number Among All Ages, by Gender, 1999-2021.  The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. overdose deaths involving any opioid from 1999 to 2021. Any opioid includes prescription opioids (natural and semi-synthetic opioids and methadone), heroin, and synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl). Opioid-involved overdose deaths rose from 21,089 in 2010 to 47,600 in 2017 and remained steady through 2019. This was followed by a significant increase in 2020 with 68,630 reported deaths and again in 2021 with 80,411 reported overdose deaths. The bars are overlaid by lines showing the number of deaths by gender from 1999 to 2021 (Source: CDC WONDER).

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4. National Overdose Deaths Involving Prescription Opioids—# Among All Ages, 1999-2021. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. overdose deaths involving commonly prescribed opioids (including natural and semi-synthetic opioids and methadone) from 1999 to 2021. Drug overdose deaths involving prescription opioids rose from 3,442 in 1999 to 17,029 in 2017. From 2017 to 2019, the number of deaths declined to 14,139. This was followed by a slight increase in 2020, with 16,416 reported deaths. In 2021, the number of reported deaths involving prescription opioids totaled 16,706. The bars are overlaid by a line showing the number of deaths involving prescription opioids in combination with synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl). A second line shows prescription opioids without any other opioid from 1999 to 2021 and demonstrates that commonly prescribed opioids are no longer driving the overdose crisis 

5. National Overdose Deaths Involving Heroin, by Other Opioid Involvement—Number Among All Ages, 1999-2021. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. overdose deaths involving heroin from 1999 to 2021. Drug overdose deaths involving heroin rose from 1,960 in 1999 to 15,482 in 2017 before trending down to 13,165 deaths in 2020 and 9,173 deaths in 2021. The bars are overlaid by lines showing the number of deaths involving heroin in combination with synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl) or without any other opioid from 1999 to 2021

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6. National Overdose Deaths Involving Stimulants (cocaine and psychostimulants), by Opioid Involvement—Number Among All Ages, 1999-2021. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. overdose deaths involving stimulants from 1999 to 2021. Drug overdose deaths rose from 12,122 in 2015 to 53,495 in 2021. The bars are overlaid by lines showing the number of deaths involving stimulants in combination with synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl) or without any opioid. The number of deaths involving stimulants has increased steadily since 2014 regardless of opioid involvement

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7. National Overdose Deaths Involving Psychostimulants With Abuse Potential (Primarily Methamphetamine), by Opioid Involvement—Number Among All Ages, 1999-2021. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. overdose deaths involving psychostimulants with abuse potential from 1999 to 2021. Drug overdose deaths involving psychostimulants with abuse potential rose from 547 in 1999 to 23,837 in 2020 and continued to increase to 32,537 deaths in 2021. The bars are overlaid by lines showing the number of deaths involving psychostimulants in combination with synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl) or without any opioid. The number of deaths involving psychostimulants has increased steadily since 2014 regardless of opioid involvement 

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8. National Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Cocaine, by Opioid Involvement—Number Among All Ages, 1999-2021. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. overdose deaths involving cocaine from 1999 to 2021. Drug overdose deaths involving cocaine rose steadily from 6,784 in 2015 to 15,883 in 2019. From 2019 to 2021, cocaine-involved deaths rose nearly 54% to 24,486 deaths. The bars are overlaid by lines showing the number of deaths involving cocaine in combination with synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl) or without any opioid. The number of deaths in combination with synthetic opioids other than methadone has increased significantly since 2015 and is the main driver of cocaine-involved overdose deaths 

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9. National Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Benzodiazepines, by Opioid Involvement—Number Among All Ages, 1999-2021. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. overdose deaths involving benzodiazepines from 1999 to 2021. Drug overdose deaths involving benzodiazepines steadily increased from 1,135 in 1999 to 11,537 in 2017 and declined to 9,711 in 2019. Between 2019 and 2021, deaths rose again to 12,499. The bars are overlaid by lines showing the number of deaths involving benzodiazepines in combination with synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl) or without any opioid 

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10. National Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Antidepressants, by Opioid Involvement–Number Among All Ages, 1999-2021. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. overdose deaths involving antidepressants from 1999 to 2021. Drug overdose deaths involving antidepressants rose steadily from 1,749 in 1999 to 5,269 in 2017. Since then, deaths have slightly risen with 5,859 in 2021. The bars are overlaid by lines showing the number of deaths involving antidepressants in combination with synthetic opioids other than methadone (primarily fentanyl) or without any opioid involvement 

How Dangerous is Fentanyl  

Fentanyl is an opioid that can be mixed with other substances. When taken by someone without tolerance to opioids, fentanyl can rapidly cause someone to stop breathing and die. Fentanyl is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine.

We need to educate people how to prevent more deathes

We will be providing a protection, testing and first aid, as well as contacts to report, investigate and support for this crises

We need to educate people how to prevent more deathes

The investigations of this trafficking problem needs to be the way to eliminating this problem and putting a Stop to these murders of our youth.

One Pill can kill

We need to educate people how to prevent more deathes

Sales of this drug is Murder not an overdose. Just think if you were told your being sold a pill that will kill you, would you be buying it ? NO and neither would your child if they knew. Let's stop misrepresent this !

The investigations of this trafficking problem needs to be the way to eliminating this problem and putting a Stop to these murders of our youth.

What are the steps we're taking 

Columbia County DA Bobby Christine announces inditement in suspicious death. 

THIS IS NOT SUSPICIOUS DEATH THIS WAS POISENING (MURDER)

 

Columbia County DA Bobby Christine annou in suspicious death. 

Published: Jun. 13, 2022 at 6:34 PM EDT

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) - A family is making an 11th-hour plea to the Columbia County district attorney to reconsider a possible plea deal in a murder case.

It’s not just any murder case. Colin Magill’s arrest was the first of its kind in Columbia County.

Back in February, a grand jury indicted him on murder charges in the overdose of Alex King. Magill is accused of selling king pills laced with fentanyl.

This was supposed to send a powerful message to drug dealers, but four months later, King’s family is worried the DA is about to take it all back.

Memorial
In Loving Memory Of The Lives We Lost To Fentanyl Poisoning

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